«Pspawner demo» by Bruno Ruviaro

on 11 Nov'16 14:23 in

A short classroom demonstration of sequencing patterns with Pspawner

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// ===================================
// SynthDefs here
// ===================================

// Your SynthDefs go here
(




) // end of SynthDefs







// ===================================
// Define a bunch of "score snippets"
// ===================================

(

~beat = Pbind(
    \degree, [0, 7],
    \ctranspose, 24,
    \dur, 0.2,
    \legato, 0.1,
    \amp, Pseq([0.2, 0.12, 0.16, 0.12], inf)
); // forever pattern

~up = Pbind(
	\scale, Scale.major,
    \degree, Pseq([0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7], 1), // finite pattern
    \dur, 0.2
);

~down = Pbind(
	\scale, Scale.minor,
    \degree, Pseq([7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1, 0], 1), // finite pattern
    \dur, 0.1,
);

~trill = Pbind(
	\degree, Pseq([8, 9], 4), // finite Pattern
    \dur, 0.1
);

~thick = Pbind(
    \degree, Pseq([0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7], 1), // finite Pattern
    \dur, 0.2,
    \mtranspose, [0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14]
);

) // end of Pbind definitions





// ============
// Quick test
// ============

~beat.play;
~up.play;
~down.play;
~trill.play;
~thick.play;






// =====================
// Sequencing & playing
// using Pspawner
// =====================

// The advantage is that the spawner *knows* when a pattern has finished.
// (... as opposed to sequencing patterns inside a {}.fork)

// It's like a fork (things happen in order top to bottom), but
// you always use the spawner argument (in this case, "maestro" -- arbitrary name)
// in order to request a new pattern.

// Notice you should NOT put any .play inside the Pspawner. The only .play is at the very end of the Pspawner.

// When you write "maestro.seq(somePattern)", you are saying:
// "maestro, please play this pattern and only move on in the sequence AFTER said pattern is finished".

// When you write "maestro.par(somePattern)", you are saying:
// "maestro, please start playing this pattern and MOVE ON RIGHT AWAY to the next line."

// Patterns that self-terminate will do so as expected.
// Patterns that do not self-terminate (inf) will keep going forever until told to stop.

// TIP 1: Notice that if you write maestro.seq(someInfPattern) you are setting yourself up for failture. If you request maestro to play an *infinite* pattern and only move on when it's finished, maestro will never move on.

// TIP 2: In order to control start and stop of specific patterns, you should declare a new variable to name it (as you learned before). See ~player1 example below.



(
Pspawner({ arg maestro;

	"Scales in sequence, one right after the other".postln;
    maestro.seq(~up);
	"Down...".postln;
    maestro.seq(~down);

	"With a little pause in between".postln;
    maestro.wait(2.5);
    maestro.seq(~up);
    maestro.wait(1);
    maestro.seq(~down);
    maestro.wait(1);

	"Now two of them in paralell".postln;
    maestro.seq(Ppar([~up, ~down]));

	maestro.wait(4);

	"Now the never-ending beat".postln;
    // Saving into a variable so I can stop it later
    ~player1 = maestro.par(~beat);
    maestro.wait(4);

	"Up again...".postln;
    maestro.seq(~up);
    maestro.wait(1);

	"Stop player1 beta".postln;
	maestro.suspend(~player1); // stop that one
    maestro.wait(1);

	"Play the thick pattern".postln;
    maestro.seq(~thick);

	"Bye!".postln;
    maestro.suspendAll;

}).play
)
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